[NASA] A Full Moon Over the Pacific

The crew of the International Space Station snapped this image of a full Moon as the orbiting complex flew 270 miles above the South Pacific Ocean off the coast of South America. via NASA https://ift.tt/2Z9HMmw

[NASA] Hubble Catches 2 Galaxies at Play

This galactic duo is known as UGC 2369. The galaxies are interacting, meaning that their mutual gravitational attraction is pulling them closer and closer together and distorting their shapes in the process. via NASA https://ift.tt/2MRIhuS

[NASA] Hubble Spots Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

This new Hubble Space Telescope view of Jupiter, taken on June 27, 2019, reveals the giant planet’s trademark Great Red Spot, and a more intense color palette in the clouds swirling in Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years. via NASA https://ift.tt/33lm7qv

Jupiter Engulfed and the Milky Way

This is a good month to see Jupiter. To find our Solar System‘s largest planet in your sky, look toward the southeast just after sunset — Jupiter should be the brightest object in that part of the sky. If you have a binoculars or a small telescope, you should be able to see Jupiter‘s four brightest moons right nearby, and possibly some cloud bands. The featured image was taken about … Read More →

[NASA] Our Sun Today

NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory, or SDO, was the first mission to be launched for NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) Program, and is designed to understand the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. via NASA https://ift.tt/2Yr24rX

A Total Solar Eclipse Reflected

If you saw a total solar eclipse, would you do a double-take? One astrophotographer did just that — but it took a lake and a bit of planning. Realizing that the eclipse would be low on the horizon, he looked for a suitable place along the thin swath of South America that would see, for a few minutes, the Moon completely block the Sun, both directly and in reflection. The … Read More →

Rumors of a Dark Universe

Twenty-one years ago results were first presented indicating that most of the energy in our universe is not in stars or galaxies but is tied to space itself. In the language of cosmologists, a large cosmological constant — dark energy — was directly implied by new distant supernova observations. Suggestions of a cosmological constant were not new — they have existed since the advent of modern relativistic cosmology. Such claims … Read More →