[NASA] Feb. 9, 1995, Bernard Harris and Michael Foale Ready For a Spacewalk

STS-63 astronauts Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander (right), and C. Michael Foale, mission specialist (left), are ready to exit space shuttle Discovery’s airlock for a spacewalk on Feb. 9, 1995. On this extravehicular activity (EVA), which lasted 4 hours and 38 minutes, Bernard Harris became the first African-American to walk in space. via NASA http://ift.tt/20TmLnI

Light Pillars over Alaska

What’s happening behind those houses? Pictured here are not auroras but nearby light pillars, a nearby phenomenon that can appear as a distant one. In most places on Earth, a lucky viewer can see a Sun-pillar, a column of light appearing to extend up from the Sun caused by flat fluttering ice-crystals reflecting sunlight from the upper atmosphere. Usually these ice crystals evaporate before reaching the ground. During freezing temperatures, … Read More →

[NASA] Space Station Flyover of Super Bowl 50

On the evening of Feb. 7, 2016, Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly snapped this photo of Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. from the International Space Station, writing, “Got to see the #SuperBowl in person after all! But at 17,500MPH, it didn’t last long. #YearInSpace” via NASA http://ift.tt/20Rhu07

Advanced LIGO: Gravitational Wave Detectors Upgraded

Accelerate a charge and you’ll get electromagnetic radiation: light. But accelerate any mass and you’ll get gravitational radiation. Light is seen all the time, but, so far, a confirmed direct detection of gravitational radiation has been elusive. When absorbed, gravitational waves create a tiny symmetric jiggle similar to squashing a rubber ball and letting go quickly. Separated detectors can be used to discern gravitational waves from everyday bumps. Powerful astronomical … Read More →